A Love That Was More Than A Love

For reasons that she could not explain, Marjorie Toadsmoor had fallen madly in love with Linus Pinfarthing. To borrow from Edgar Alan Poe, she loved with a love that was more than a love… but sadly, unlike the eponymous Annabel Lee, she had no choice in the matter. Linus had been possessed by the Trickster, and a glamour had been put upon Marjorie which had left her totally in thrall to the louche and charming young man.
Although at least as old as humankind, Trickster was not as wise as he believed himself to be. It had never occurred to him that Linus might have genuine feelings for the girl, and that to see her ensnared within this enchantment, like a beautiful butterfly caught in a web, troubled him. Linus decided that he would rather that she hated him than for both of them to be manipulated in this way. You see, there was still a tiny spark of humanity flickering dimly in Linus, and although Trickster owned him, body and soul, he secretly strove to break free. It was after a drinking competition in ‘The Crow’ one evening that he discovered, by chance, that when he was inebriated the old rogue had no power over him at all.

“Oh Linus, why are you always drunk these days?”
A tearful Marjorie looked at the love of her life, sprawled awkwardly over an armchair. He reeked of stale alcohol and there were vomit stains on his once immaculate suit jacket.
“It’s because of you,” he slurred. “Can’t you see that this stifling, overbearing affection of yours has driven me to drink.”
Even as he said these words, Linus choked back his tears. The last person in the world whom he wanted to hurt was Marjorie, but he knew that he had to somehow free her from this illusion.
“Then you do not love me any more?”
He heard the tremble in her voice and, even through his drunken haze, wanted nothing more than to hold her close and tell her the truth. However, he steeled himself and shook his head.
“Never did. You were just… a plaything to me.”
Marjorie’s face went a deathly white and tears welled in her eyes. Without another word he watched as she fled from the room. Then it was his turn to weep.

Bartholomew Middlestreet had just closed the bar of The Squid and Teapot when someone hammered on the door.
“Philomena, when are you going to remember to take your key…?” he complained, but was surprised to see that the source of the knocking was not his barmaid, Philomena Bucket, but Reverend Davies.
“Good evening Reverend, sorry I thought you were…”
“Yes, yes,” interrupted the parson impatiently. “I’m looking for Miss Toadsmoor. I’d hoped that she might be here visiting the Bucket woman. She should really be back at the orphanage by this time. Tomorrow is a school day, and she has to be up early. It really is not good enough.”
Bartholomew was not one of Reverend Davies’ greatest fans, and looked at him icily.
“If you mean my valued barmaid, Miss Bucket, she is not on the premises at the moment, and neither is Miss Toadsmoor. I can’t help you Reverend. Goodnight,” he said, and started to close the door.
“Wait, please,” The Reverend’s tone had softened. “I’m sorry. To be honest Mr Middlestreet I am worried, worried more than you can guess. I have always found Miss Toadsmoor to be conscientious and above reproach, but lately… well, she has changed. Something is amiss, I am sure.”
Bartholomew and the Reverend stared at each other for a moment, the silence broken only by the ticking of the grandfather clock in the bar. It was unlike Davies to be so agitated, Bartholomew thought. Yes, something was definitely amiss and it would not surprise him if Linus Pinfarthing, whom he did not like or trust, was at the bottom of it.
“I’ll round up a search party, she can’t have gone too far.” he said, without much conviction.

Neither Reverend Davies nor Bartholomew could have guessed that Marjorie was romantically involved with Linus. Despite the Trickster’s spell, she was, as you may recall, still very much a Victorian lady, whose dread of scandal over-rode all other concerns. It was with this in mind that her love affair had been conducted with the utmost discretion; it was a secret shared with no one but her best friend, Philomena, who, while not a little surprised, could be guaranteed to be non-judgemental, prudent and fiercely loyal.

After fleeing from Linus, Marjorie rushed blindly into the night, careless of who or what might see her. His sudden rejection had left her bereft, her heart broken into a million shards. Remember, this was no ordinary loss, forged, as it was, from a cruel and unbreakable Trickster spell. It was darker, deeper and more painful than most would ever know. Trickster had ensured that without Linus’ love, her life would not be worth living.

Staggering to his feet, Linus blundered unsteadily after Marjorie. By now he was beginning to sober up, and he could already feel the Trickster trying to get a foothold inside his mind once more. He took a deep swig of the Gannicox Vodka from the flask that was never far from his hand these days, in an attempt to push the unwelcome tenant away.
“You can’t stay drunk forever, traitor,” hissed a voice in his head.
“Watch me,” retorted Linus, taking another slug of liquor, and the voice grew fainter.

He was just a dozen yards from the headland when the full moon managed to fight its way through the ever-present fog. There she was, standing at the very edge of the cliff, her long cloak fluttering in the breeze, silhouetted against the backdrop of sea and sky.
“Marjorie.. I am sorry. I didn’t mean what I said… please…”
She turned briefly at the sound of his voice. Had he been closer he would have seen the hope that flared in her eyes, but it was too late. A sudden gust of wind caught in the folds of her cloak, and she was gone.

The search-party was on the point of giving up when he appeared, carrying the lifeless form of Marjorie in his arms. Even Bartholomew felt pity for the young man as he lurched towards them, tears streaming down his face.
“I couldn’t save her…” he sobbed as helping hands lifted Marjorie’s body from him, and gently lay her on the ground. “The wind came out of the cloud by night…”.
“We know, lad, it isn’t your fault,” said Reverend Davies, displaying an unusual degree of sympathy.
Linus said nothing. He knew the truth.

Far away, up on the Gydynap Hills, Philomena Bucket and Drury both stood transfixed by the vision of a white hare that had suddenly appeared, as if from nowhere, on the pathway before them.
“How beautiful! I can’t wait to tell Marjorie.” thought Philomena happily, smiling to herself in the moonlight.

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